Logo - Black

Timing: Patrick Reed

Captain America talks about schedules and balance in an exclusive interview with Kingdom magazine
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Timing: Patrick Reed

Captain America talks about schedules and balance in an exclusive interview with Kingdom magazine

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
W

riter Erica Jong said that “fame means millions of people have the wrong idea of who you are.” Patrick Reed might agree wholeheartedly. Kingdom spent an exclusive morning with the former Masters champion, during which he expressed gratitude to his wife and former caddie, Justine, for helping with his success; he underlined the importance of teamwork in any great achievement on tour; and he stressed his desire to give back to the game that has given him so much. There wasn’t a lot of “I” in the conversation—until we got to his skills on the grill.

centered image
Patrick Reed swinging while sporting his Hublot Big Bang Unico Golf watch

“Oh yes,” Reed said. “Whenever I’m home, for birthdays or anniversaries or Christmas, I will always cook,” he said. “I own a smoker, and I do everything on that or in the oven.”

With nine victories on the PGA TOUR, including the green jacket in 2018, along with two World Golf Championships and “Captain America” appearances in the Ryder Cup and Presidents Cup, Reed is known to rock the grill. Lesser known, perhaps, is his wider perspective on the game, one that involves the greater community and landscape of golf.

“I would want to create experiences,” he said, mentioning an interest in course design. “Having an amazing practice facility and short game area, and on every golf course I built, having an academy attached to help grow the game. The things that golf instills in people, the work ethic, the determination, the responsibility, the time management; there are so many things you learn on the golf course that help you later in life. I’d want to build facilities that helped, where children could learn that—but my greens would be pretty difficult!”

He added the last comment with a laugh, explaining that he’d love to design golf courses with numerous tee box options, so that better golfers could have a TOUR-like experience but that kids and beginners could still have a good time. And good food, of course.

centered image
On-location with Patrick at Scottsdale National Golf Club

“The food would be amazing,” Reed said, explaining one of the perks of a course he would design. “There will have to be a gym as well because the people who come there will be eating so well, that if they keep on coming they’ll be gaining a bunch of weight!” He said this with a smile, as dedicated to enjoying life with his family as he is to his job.

“For you to get to the place that we are, the top half percent in the world of the population of golf,” Reed began… “Without the foundation that we have that’s built, we wouldn’t have gotten to this point. The foundation all starts at home.

“Golf is a physical game, you have to put in a lot of work, but golf tournaments are won between the ears. It’s not about technique and swing, it’s about if you think correctly, how you are mentally. Family is the most important thing. In our team, with Justine, she is everything. How hard she works… All I have to do is to focus on playing.”

centered image
Reed celebrates his win at the 2018 Masters

And focus he has, perhaps most notably in 2018 when he won the Masters, beating Rickie Fowler by a single shot. When asked what the most decisive shot of his career was—the one in his arsenal that has made the difference—Reed didn’t hesitate: “The helicopter,” he said. Arnold Palmer popularized the wild finish, which ends with the clubhead whipping around the golfer; but Palmer used it to prevent a hook, while Reed uses it to ensure the clubface doesn’t close—committed to an open face until the end. It’s a shot that relies a lot on timing, and timing is something that’s become a hallmark of Reed’s career, even evidenced in his partnerships, which since 2017 has included Swiss watchmaker Hublot. In addition to a sort of cultural fit, it also helps that premium watches are a particular love of Reed’s.

Watches, hands down,” he says. “The thing with Hublot for me, is that you have no sacrifices: every time you look at anything there’s something, whether it’s the fluidity or whether it’s the style whether it’s the color or how it looks. With Hublot it has everything tied together. A lot of my watches are the skeleton look where you can see the movements and you can see how everything’s timed so perfectly, and it’s so fluid and everything works together. It’s a lot like a golf swing: you need that timing, you need everything to move so fluidly and match up at the exact same time.

“With Hublot it’s been an amazing crew and an amazing company to be with because we feel they’re just as determined to strive to be the best. They want to be the best with their product but also they’re about how they treat people with their customer service. We’re so determined to get to No.1 and while we’re doing that to help grow the game, but also when we’re out here to try to help out as much as possible. It’s a great relationship.”

Committed to his family, and with his partnerships and goals aligned, Reed remains focused on the course in front of him. That might include questions, but it will also include plenty of good times, great food, and plans for the future—which certainly will involve family.

“I love being at home,” Reed said, after reflecting on a schedule that’s had him traveling something like 40,000 miles since last October. “I love being with the kiddos, spending time with them. But with our job, we know we have to travel. When you’re traveling, that means usually you’re doing the right thing, you’re playing well, getting into more events. But that just makes you cherish the moments when you’re actually at home. And then, I’ll get to see [the kids] in the morning before they go to school. I’ll go to practice while they’re at school so I won’t miss them, and then by the time they’re coming home I’m already home. You get time with family, and it’s not in the way of me working. It’s all about balance.”

centered image
Patrick Reed and wife (former Caddie) Justine

gallery

Masters that changed golf

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Volutpat lectus leo in eu sagittis

1/5
New Project
New Project
1/5
New Project
New Project

Share this article

Share this article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Other Topics